New military communications satellite launches successfully

CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, FL – The second Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite built by Lockheed Martin for the U.S. Navy is responding to commands after being launched July 19 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL.
The MUOS constellation replaces the legacy Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Follow-On system and delivers secure, prioritized voice and data communications, a first for mobile users who need high-speed mission data on the go.

“MUOS is providing capability for mobile users that never existed before,” said Iris Bombelyn, Lockheed Martin vice president of Narrowband Communications. “We look forward to testing and delivering the second satellite of the MUOS constellation to our Navy customer. This on-orbit testing will prove the MUOS system capabilities and allow us to deliver the full suite of services available through the MUOS payloads, on MUOS-1 as well as MUOS-2.”
MUOS-2 launched aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket and will transition over the next nine days to reach its geosynchronous orbit location 22,000 miles above the earth. The solar arrays and antennas will then be deployed, and on-orbit testing will start for subsequent turn-over to the Navy for test and commissioning to service.
At the launch, Lockheed Martin hosted teachers from the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) New Science Teacher Academy. The NSTA fellows experienced how science can solve real-world challenges, helping teachers inspire and encourage student interest in science and math once they return to the classroom.
The first MUOS satellite, launched in 2012, has been providing high quality legacy voice communications for users, and terminals are already testing using the advanced payload that enables data exchanges. More than 20,000 existing terminals are compatible with and can access the MUOS legacy payload, and with the release of the new waveform developed for increased data-handling capacity, many of these terminals can be retro-fitted to access the Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) payload.
The geosynchronous constellation consists of four satellites and one on-orbit spare, which are expected to achieve full operational capability in 2015, extending UHF narrowband communications availability well past 2025.
Source: Lockheed Martin